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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Freshening China’s Fish Farms

 

Consumer demand in both the U.S. and China for safe and healthy farmed fish is shaping aquaculture practices in the world’s most populous country. And fish farmers are using traditional Chinese medicine as well as high-tech monitoring systems as they strive to keep their fish healthy and their farming practices transparent.

 

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Consumer demand in both the U.S. and China for safe and healthy farmed fish is shaping aquaculture practices in the world’s most populous country. And fish farmers are using traditional Chinese medicine as well as high-tech monitoring systems as they strive to keep their fish healthy and their farming practices transparent.

Golden Gobi Grizzlies

 

Just a few dozen grizzly bears with bright yellow coats live in the forbidding Gobi Desert in Mongolia. Writer and wildlife biologist Douglas Chadwick has returned to the Gobi desert season after season to track these astonishing bears, and authored a book on how they survive and what can be done to better protect them.

 

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Polar Bear Summits Talus Mound

 

Up in the arctic north of Canada’s Akpatok Island, a large, male polar bear climbs crags in search of murre fledglings, but instead finds a plane full of sightseers rounding the bluff, surprising each other.

 

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Dangerous Drifting Particles

 

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are toxic air pollutants produced by combustion linked to lung cancer and other serious health problems. They’re mostly seen as a local bad air issue, but recent findings suggest that these tiny particles travel long distances and significantly increase overall health risks.

 

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War Veterans Farm For Health

 

Veterans must often wait months for health appointments at VA facilities. So a combat vet in Georgia founded a farm designed to immerse returning soldiers in the restorative rigors of working the land, a special boost for those suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. Reporter Sean Powers has the story.

 

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Finding New Tyrannosaurs

 

Sixty-five million years ago, T. Rex was the biggest carnivore on earth – and to this day it looms large in our imaginations. But science is finding this iconic tyrant was but one of more than two dozen other species of tyrannosaur, a diverse group that came in all sorts of shapes and sizes--and researchers expect to find even more species.

 

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Ancient Underwater Forest in the Gulf of Mexico

 

Sixty feet beneath the water off the coast of Alabama is a forest of cypress trees that is more than 50,000 years old.

 

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Australia May Scrap Carbon Tax

 

China is the world’s largest emitter, and much of its coal comes from Australia. With the election of a new Prime Minister, Australia looks set to revoke its carbon tax, leaving many environmentalists worried about their country’s contribution to climate change. (photo: Bigstockphoto.com)

 

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Deepwater Disaster Three Years On

 

Just three years ago, the Deep Water Horizon oil spill poured 200 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Now, a team of chemists, engineers, and biologists is attempting to assess the damage to the Gulf ecosystem.

 

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Chemicals Reduce Sperm Counts

Fifteen years ago, over half of potential sperm donors in Hunan Province, China met quality standards. Today, only 18% meet those standards, and the decline is blamed on endocrine disrupting chemicals.

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Freshening China’s Fish Farms

Consumer demand in both the U.S. and China for safe and healthy farmed fish is shaping aquaculture practices in the world’s most populous country. And fish farmers are using traditional Chinese medicine as well as high-tech monitoring systems as they strive to keep their fish healthy and their farming practices transparent.

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Golden Gobi Grizzlies

Just a few dozen grizzly bears with bright yellow coats live in the forbidding Gobi Desert in Mongolia. Writer and wildlife biologist Douglas Chadwick has returned to the Gobi desert season after season to track these astonishing bears, and authored a book on how they survive and what can be done to better protect them.

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This Week’s Show
August 18, 2017
listen / download


Chemicals Reduce Sperm Counts

listen / download
Fifteen years ago, over half of potential sperm donors in Hunan Province, China met quality standards. Today, only 18% meet those standards, and the decline is blamed on endocrine disrupting chemicals.

Freshening China’s Fish Farms

listen / download
Consumer demand in both the U.S. and China for safe and healthy farmed fish is shaping aquaculture practices in the world’s most populous country. And fish farmers are using traditional Chinese medicine as well as high-tech monitoring systems as they strive to keep their fish healthy and their farming practices transparent.

BirdNote: Thieving Frigatebirds

listen / download
Some seabirds are brilliant at catching fish, but as Mary McCann explains, blue-footed boobies need to watch out for hungry thieving Frigatebirds.

Golden Gobi Grizzlies

listen / download
Just a few dozen grizzly bears with bright yellow coats live in the forbidding Gobi Desert in Mongolia. Writer and wildlife biologist Douglas Chadwick has returned to the Gobi desert season after season to track these astonishing bears, and authored a book on how they survive and what can be done to better protect them.

Polar Bear Summits Talus Mound

listen / download
Up in the arctic north of Canada’s Akpatok Island, a large, male polar bear climbs crags in search of murre fledglings, but instead finds a plane full of sightseers rounding the bluff, surprising each other.


Special Features

A River Town in Transition

listen / download
Wrangell, Alaska is a small, isolated town at the mouth of the mighty Stikine River and a former a timber capital. But since the saw mills shut down in the ‘90s, the small town has reinvented itself as a tourist destination and a commercial fishing hub. Since both of these industries are dependent on the Stikine, some locals worry that a mining development upriver could put the whole town’s livelihood at risk.
Blog Series: Alaskan River Riches

Close Encounter with a Tabular Iceberg: Mark Seth Lender
Living on Earth's Resident Explorer Mark Seth Lender describes an encounter with a tabular iceberg similar (though much smaller) to the one that recently broke off of the Larsen C ice sheet.
Blog Series: Living on Earth


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...Ultimately, if we are going prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we are going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them...

-- President Barack Obama, November 6, 2015 on why he declined to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline.

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